Wednesday, 13 June 2018

Church of St. Raphael the Archangel, Millbrook

History

Opened in 1963, St Raphael the Archangel was built after Millbrook was made its own parish. It served an area that was formerly part of the parish of St Peter’s, Stalybridge.
 
Following a succession of well-attended masses celebrated in the canteen of Staley Mill, Millbrook, from 1946, Bishop John Murphy of Shrewsbury took the decision in 1958 to constitute Millbrook as a new parish.
 
He dedicated it to the St Raphael, one of the three Archangels named in the Bible.
 
That same year Father James Fraser arrived in Millbrook and began to celebrate masses, hear confessions and perform baptisms from a rented house and later from a wooden parish hall.
 
On October 14, 1961 Bishop Murphy laid the foundation stone and on April 25, 1963 his successor, Bishop Eric Grasar, solemnly blessed and opened the church building.
 
The neighbouring presbytery was occupied the following month and the primary school opened in February 1969. However, it closed in July 2011 after a repair bill of an estimated £250,000 could not be met, with several parishioners moving to St Joseph’s in Mossley.
 
St Raphael’s does hold a small place in Catholic history, however, as it was the place where Canon Anthony Kay – currently Vicar General in the Diocese of Salford and parish priest of St Mary’s in Manchester, known as The Hidden Gem – was ordained.
 
St Raphael’s was listed by Historic England for several reasons, notably its design and the large stained glass window by Pierre Fourmaintraux.
 
Source:
http://www.mossleycorrespondent.co.uk/?p=1828
 
Esoteric Eric
 









 

Friday, 8 June 2018

Fruit Bowl, Chesterfield

History

Several short culverted sections of the River Hipper underneath a retail park.

Esoteric Eric








Tuesday, 29 May 2018

Washout, South Yorkshire

History

A sewer inspection chamber on the network just downstream of the local treatment works. The room runs underneath a railway track and the older parts feature the markings of the stone mason. The brick outfall changes to corrugated pipe running for around 100m before reaching the River Don.

Esoteric Eric








Wednesday, 16 May 2018

Rumbelow, Denby Dale

History

The River Dearne reaches the A635 Barnsley Road bridge at Denby Dale. Below the bridge, the Munchcliffe Beck joins, and there is a large millpond, which supplied mills at Denby Dale.
 
In 1932 a typhoid outbreak killed 12 people in Denby Dale from contaminated water in Square Wood reservoir. Some years earlier water closests had been installed for houses at Quaker Bottom and the sewer drainage from these houses was made to discharge in to the Munchcliffe Beck.
 
Source:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Dearne
https://www.examiner.co.uk/lifestyle/family-history-80-years-typhoid-4941303
 
Esoteric Eric

















Tuesday, 8 May 2018

Xenomorph, Sheffield

History

A 200m culverted section of the Meersbrook just upstream from the infall of the 'Stoopatron', featuring lots of strange ochre tinted calcifications.

Esoteric Eric