Saturday, 2 November 2019

Royal High School/ Parliament House, Scotland

History

The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neo-classical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens.

After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit.

Source:
https://www.bcd-urbex.com/old-royal-high-school-new-parliament-house-edinburgh-scotland/

Esoteric Eric







Wednesday, 25 September 2019

Workshops for the Blind, Stoke-on-Trent

History


The building is built on the site of the former Rialto Pottery Works and is designed in the Art Deco style. The Workshops for the Blind were opened in October 1934 at a cost of of £30,000. For many years they supplied products to the pottery industry and by 2009 there were 44 employees. After a number of loss making years, the works were transferred from the City Council to a new owner and renamed 'Stoke Workshop for the Blind and Disabled'. In 2011 the business was closed, half of the workforce was made redundant and a new business relaunched at the same premises as 'Stoke Disabled Employment Ltd'. In 2018 proposals were made to develop the site in to 64 dwellings as part of a £8.9 million investment. The proposals suggest that the frontage of the building would be retained.

Source:
http://www.thepotteries.org/photo_wk/182.htm

Esoteric Eric














Saturday, 31 August 2019

Price & Kensington Pottery, National Teapot Works, Stoke-on-Trent

History

Price's National Teapots (also known as Top Bridge Works) has been occupied by Price Brothers since the 1890s, becoming Price & Kensington after an amalgamation in 1962. Along with the Spode factory, the Top Bridge Works is the earliest surviving example of a fire proof pottery works. The main warehouse along the roadside and the one remaining bottle kiln are both listed buildings. Today part of the buildings are used by a mix of small businesses such as a gym, carwash and bric-a-brac shop.

Source:
https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/threads/price-kensington-pottery-national-teapot-works-stoke-on-trent-august-2019.119432/

Esoteric Eric









Sunday, 18 August 2019

HF4 Blast Furnace/ Compressor House, Charleroi, Belgium

History

Haut Fourneau 4, commonly known as just HF4 was part of the Cockerill-Sambre steel works, a vast industrial site in Belgium. Steel has been produced at the site since the early 1800’s. The blast furnace was used for smelting iron ore, and was the major technique used for the production of steel at the time. The iron and steel produced at HF4 was mainly used for car production, an industry that almost collapsed in 2008. Production at the steel works was halted and the plant placed on standby. The facility was sold to another company, however production was never restarted and in 2012 the site was closed down after a failed merger.

The Compressor House, or Turbo Blower House is an integral part of the HF4 Blast Furnace site in Belgium. The production of iron requires a constant supply of air to be blown through the blast furnace as high pressure – hence the name “blast” furnace. The process of compressing the air works just like a power station in reverse. Rather than high pressure gasses (usually steam) driving the turbines, which in turn drive an alternator in a power station, almost exactly the same equipment is used the other way around. The electricity powers the motor, which in turns drive the blades in the compressor to compress the air. The power and steam was provided from a near-by power station at Monceau-sur-Sambre (often called Power Plant IM) via a huge cable-run and pipeline connecting the two sites. A stand-by diesel generator is also housed in the turbine hall.

Source:
https://www.bcd-urbex.com/hf4-blast-furnace-belgium/
https://www.bcd-urbex.com/hf4-turbo-blower-house-belgium/

Esoteric Eric
















La Turbine, Belgium

History

Albert Primez, a small industrialist in the area, who owned the Marmor Workshops, a small marble cutting and a shaping plant, decided to produce electricity by his own means. In 1909, he set up a small hydroelectric power plant in an old hammer forge established along the Biesme in the woods between Gougines and Sart-Eustache. This small unit was nicknamed 'The Turbine' by the inhabitants of the neighbouring villages. Later, Albert Primez also financed the installation of lighting in Gougines.

Source:
http://www.molenechos.org/molen.php?nummer=6176

Esoteric Eric






Castle of Cense au Bois AKA Chateau Cinderella, Belgium

History


This extensive chateau was built after the French Revolution during the 1860’s. It was owned by a wealthy family who resided here until 1984. In 1999 it became a hotel and restaurant and it was abandoned in 2005.

Source:
https://abandonedplaygrounds.com/2019/05/01/the-chateau-cinderella-abandoned-mansion-of-luxury/

Esoteric Eric








Military Vehicle Graveyard, Belgium

History

A variety of vehicles stored in a field on military land.

Esoteric Eric